Colon Health: Eat Your Fruits and Vegetables

Over 100,000 new cases of colon (colorectal) cancer occur in the United States every year. Colon cancer is most prevalent in Westernized societies, where diets are higher in animal products and processed foods and lower in unrefined plant foods. 

Studies suggest that diet is a key contributor to colon cancer risk. The cells lining the intestinal tract come into direct contact with what we choose to eat – the substances contained in our food can have profound effects on these cells and tissues. The protective value of fruits and vegetables has been established by several studies following subjects for years, keeping track of dietary patterns and colon cancer diagnoses. So what you choose to eat can help prevent colon cancer, especially if your diet includes more vegetables and fruits and less refined and processed foods.

Prevention starts with screening and awareness

March is colorectal cancer awareness month and the perfect time to become familiar with risk factors and prevention. Risk factors include the following:

  • Age 50 or older
  • A family history of cancer of the colon or rectum
  • A personal history of cancer of the colon, rectum, ovary, endometrium, or breast
  • History of polyps in the colon
  • A history of ulcerative colitis (ulcers in the lining of the large intestine) or Crohn’s disease
  • Eating a diet high in fat (especially from red meat)
  • Obesity
  • Smoking
  • Alcohol use

The prognosis and chance of recovery following a colon cancer diagnosis depends on several items, including the stage of the cancer when discovered, damage it may have already caused, blood chemistry and a patient’s general health. If you experience any stomach discomfort, bleeding in your stool, or sudden weight loss, contact your physician immediately.

Beginning at age 50 (age 45 for African Americans), both men and women at average risk for developing colorectal cancer should receive a screening test. These tests are designed to find both early cancer and polyps. There are simple blood and stool tests, and surgical testing such as colonoscopies can be done virtually (using diagnostic imagery) or surgically. Talk to your doctor about which test is best for you.

What you eat – or don’t eat – can hurt you

People once thought that there was little that they could do to protect themselves against cancer. But we’ve learned more about how the disease develops and what biological and environmental factors increase cancer risk. We now have better weapons for fighting the disease, including more options for diagnosis and treatment, improved therapies and new technologies for early detection.

Most important, we can take steps to protect ourselves against cancer.  Everyone can lower their overall cancer risk by being active and eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables

Nutritious foods are very rich in fiber, and disease-causing foods are generally fiber-deficient. Several food components that may modulate colon cancer risk have been identified: Fiber, omega-3 and -6 fatty acids, and certain antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals all play a partial role.  Red meat and processed meats are the most cancer causing, but all meats and dairy products do not contain any fiber, and are also lacking in anti-oxidants and phytochemicals. Foods made from refined grains (such as white bread, white rice, and pasta) are also not only fiber deficient but void of micronutrients and phytochemicals as well – these foods are also associated with colon and rectal cancers.

So in summation, our food choices at each meal influence our future health. Research suggests that up to 35 percent of cancers are related to poor diet. Choosing a diet rich in nutrient-dense plant foods like vegetables, fruits, beans, nuts, and seeds is a simple step we can take to protect ourselves against colon cancer. And by remaining active and exercising regularly, we can reduce our risk of cancer and other health problems.

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Be sure to check out the CBIA Healthy Connections wellness program at your company’s next renewal. It’s free as part of your participation in CBIA Health Connections!

Our Kidneys Are Important; Take Care of Them

We have two kidneys. They are fist-sized and located in the middle of our back, on the left and right sides of our spine. The kidneys filter our blood, removing wastes and extra water to make urine. They also help control blood pressure and make hormones that our body needs to stay healthy.

When the kidneys are damaged, they can’t filter waste effectively, which then can build up in the body. For most people, kidney damage occurs slowly over many years, often due to diabetes or high blood pressure. This is called chronic kidney disease. When someone has a sudden change in kidney function — because of illness, or injury, or have taken certain medications — this is called acute kidney injury. This can occur in a person with normal kidneys or in someone who already has kidney problems.

Kidney disease is a growing problem. More than 20 million Americans may have kidney disease and many more are at risk. Anyone can develop kidney disease, regardless of age or race. April is National Kidney Month, and a good opportunity to think about improving your diet to prevent damage to your kidneys and a whole host of other nutrition-related health issues. The main risk factors for developing kidney disease include diabetes, high-blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, and a family history of kidney failure.

Early kidney disease has no signs or symptoms. You may not feel any different until your kidney disease is very advanced. Blood and urine tests are the only way to know if you have kidney disease. A blood test checks your glomerular filtration rate (GFR), which tells how well your kidneys are filtering. A urine test checks for protein in your urine.

The sooner you know you have kidney disease, the sooner you can get treatment to help delay or prevent kidney failure. Treatment may include taking medicines called ACE inhibitors or ARBs to manage high blood pressure and keep your kidneys healthier longer. Treating kidney disease may also help prevent heart disease.

Lose your salt shaker

What you eat and drink can help prevent or slow down chronic kidney disease. Some foods are better for your kidneys than others. Cooking and preparing your food from scratch can help you eat healthier.

The first steps to eating right involve choosing and preparing foods with less salt and sodium. To help control your blood pressure, your diet should contain less than 1,500 milligrams of sodium each day. Here are five simple steps for healthier eating:

Step 1: Buy fresh food more often. Sodium (a part of salt) is added to many packaged foods.

  • Use spices, herbs, and sodium-free seasonings in place of salt
  • Check the Nutrition Facts label on food packages for sodium — Daily Value of 20 percent or more means the food is high in sodium
  • Try lower-sodium versions of frozen dinners and other convenience foods
  • Rinse canned vegetables, beans, meats, and fish with water before eating
  • Look for food labels that say “sodium free, salt free, low sodium, reduced or less sodium, no salt added, unsalted or lightly salted.

Step 2: Eat the right amount and the right types of protein. To help protect your kidneys, eat small portions of higher-protein foods. Protein is found in foods from plants and animals. You can talk to your physician, nutritionist or dietitian about how to choose the right combination for you. Animal-protein foods include chicken, fish, meat, eggs and dairy. Plant-protein foods include beans, nuts and grains.

Step 3: Choose foods that are healthy for your heart. To help keep fat from building up in your blood vessels, heart, and kidneys, grill, broil,  bake, roast, or stir-fry foods, instead of deep frying. Cook with nonstick cooking spray or a small amount of olive oil instead of butter. And trim fat from meat and remove skin from poultry before eating. Heart-healthy foods include:

  • Lean cuts of meat, like loin or round
  • Poultry without the skin
  • Fish
  • Beans
  • Vegetables
  • Fruits
  • Low-fat milk, yogurt, cheese

Step 4: Choose foods with less phosphorus. Phosphorus helps protect your bones and blood vessels, but too much isn’t good for us. Many packaged foods have added phosphorus. Look for phosphorus — or for words with “PHOS” — on ingredient labels. Deli meats and some fresh meat and poultry can have added phosphorus. Ask your butcher to help you pick fresh meats without added phosphorus.

Foods lower in phosphorus include:

  • Fresh fruits and vegetables
  • Breads, pasta, rice
  • Rice milk (not enriched)
  • Corn and rice cereals
  • Light-colored sodas/pop

Foods higher in phosphorus include:

  • Meat, poultry, fish
  • Bran cereals and oatmeal
  • Dairy foods
  • Beans, lentils, nuts
  • Colas

Step 5: Choose foods that have the right amount of potassium. Potassium helps our nerves and muscles work the right way. Salt substitutes can be very high in potassium, so it’s important to find a balance, since too much salt isn’t good for us, either. Read the ingredient label, and check with your provider about using salt substitutes.

Foods lower in potassium include:

  • Apples, peaches
  • Carrots, green beans
  • White bread and pasta
  • White rice
  • Rice milk (not enriched)
  • Cooked rice and wheat cereals, grits

Foods higher in potassium include:

  • Oranges, bananas
  • Potatoes, tomatoes
  • Brown and wild rice
  • Bran cereals
  • Dairy foods
  • Whole wheat bread and pasta
  • Beans and nuts

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Be sure to check out the CBIA Healthy Connections wellness program at your company’s next renewal. It’s free as part of your participation in CBIA Health Connections!

Finding a Gym That Fits You

It’s March, a perfect time for re-tuning our 2014 personal wellness plan. Hopefully we’ve done a better job of sticking to a modified diet following holiday excesses, and recognize signs of personal dietary weakness as the cold winter days continue. But as the days get longer, and the promise of milder weather hangs in the air, continuing our commitment to physical fitness and exercise at a gym, fitness center, in our homes or even at our workplaces should be an important part of our wellness plan.

If you don’t already belong to a gym or fitness center, don’t despair – they can be intimidating and expensive, working out isn’t fun for everyone, and finding time to get there is seemingly impossible with our busy schedules and obligations. Oftentimes, it’s simply a matter of feeling like we don’t “fit” properly in a gym that is a barrier to working out. Gyms and fitness centers vary significantly when it comes to demographics such as age, goals, cost, and style. Finding the right match for your needs is a critical component if you’re going to make the leap to — or sustain — regular workouts.

Here are some tips to help you find the right workout facility to match your needs and interests, and to keep you coming back week after week.

Know your personal goals and comfort issues.  Decide what you want from exercise, and what type of exercise you want to do. Do you love to swim, prefer yoga or dance, enjoy lifting weights, running on a treadmill or cycling?  Do you want to improve cardiovascular endurance, build strength, enhance flexibility — or just make it through a workout without getting bored? If variety is your thing, you need a gym with plenty of machines and lots of classes. If you just need to get in and out and sweat for 40 minutes, then paying for access to classes is a waste of money. Consider studios instead of gyms, the size of the facility, the crowd you’re working out with, and if there are personal trainers or coaches available to you if you’re interested.

Convenience is critical. Most people fail to stick with workout regimens because the facility they choose isn’t convenient to where they live or work – or only suits one of those criteria, making it tougher to get there on weekdays or weekends. Decide when you want to work out, as well – before or after work, during lunch, at nights and on weekends, for example – and make sure the center’s hours fit your schedule. Also, if you want classes, find out when the ones you want are offered. If you want to swim or play tennis, find out when the open times are and be sure they fit your schedule.

It’s okay to find a staff and workout crowd you like.  For workouts to become a regular and welcomed part of your life, it’s good if you like the people sweating around you, and the trainers and staff you deal with each visit. It’s a good idea to talk to other members about the quality of the club you’re thinking of joining, and to find out what they like about it.

It’s also okay to ask about staff credentials, certification and experience – it’s important to have qualified staff to answer questions and to guide us on proper machine alignment and techniques, or to demonstrate proper form in a class.  If you decide to hire a trainer, look for these things: a bachelor’s degree in exercise science or a related health-science discipline, experience, and, minimally, a certification from an internationally recognized organization like the American College of Sports Medicine, the National Strength and Conditioning Association, or the American Council on Exercise.

And don’t feel funny about liking or not liking the “culture” of your workout facility. If you’re not comfortable with the people around you, the music, the size of the crowd and availability of machines when you want them, shop around for a culture that is more comfortable. Always “try before you buy” – most facilities will give you a free guess pass for a visit or a week if you ask. You don’t need extra reasons to not work out!

Cleanliness and maintenance count. When touring local facilities, take a look at the equipment. Don’t just find out if they have elliptical machines; find out how many they have, how busy the machines seem to be, and how often they’re serviced.

You don’t have to be a germaphobe to want clean workout equipment. Does it appear clean? Are there sprays or wipes that you can see throughout the gym for cleaning the equipment? How many pieces of equipment are “out of order?” Of course, make sure and check the locker rooms and showers. If they’re dirty, need maintenance or don’t appear to be well tended, go somewhere else.

Are you looking for full-service or simple workouts?  In addition to access to machines and free weights, most memberships at full-service clubs include group fitness classes, lockers and showers, towels and — depending on the size of the club — racquetball and tennis courts, and a pool. There could also be services you pay extra for, like personal training, massage, a restaurant, and child care facilities. If the club you choose offers many of these options, expect to pay more than you would to join a small fitness center with a few treadmills and free weights.

How much should you have to pay for fitness? Working out at a formal facility often is not cheap. Sticker prices can range anywhere from $10 a month for a recreation center to $150 a month or more for a posh, upper-crust club. Whether you join a studio or a full-service gym with day care, showers and a pool, you’ll be incurring a new expense. Cost is usually tied to what the gym has to offer. Don’t pay for the newest, nicest health club if you’re never going to need the showers, the lockers, child care, or the pool. If all you want is to run on a treadmill, there may be a less expensive option in your area. Instead of $150 a month, you might pay $20 a month or less.

If a spouse and children are in the picture, ask about family memberships, and before you sign a contract or agreement, read the fine print; understand their payment policies and membership cancellation fees. Also, see if there is a “reciprocity agreement” that allows you to use other clubs when you’re traveling for business or on vacation.

Whatever you do, think about how you can free up the required time for regular workouts, book it on your calendar, find a friend to join you, and set reasonable personal goals. Working out is healthy and can be a lot of fun if you do it properly and find a facility that fits you just right!

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Be sure to check out the CBIA Healthy Connections wellness program at your company’s next renewal. It’s free as part of your participation in CBIA Health Connections!

Whether We Walk, Run, or Crawl, Athletic Charity Events Help Us All

According to a new survey from Aon Hewitt, the National Business Group on Health, and The Futures Company, as employers explore new ways to create and maintain a healthy and productive workforce, employees who perceive their organizations as having a strong culture of health are happier, less stressed and more likely to take control of their well-being than employees in other organizations.

For the third straight year, these organizations surveyed more than 2,700 employees and their dependents covered by employer-sponsored health plans to determine their perspectives, behaviors and attitudes towards health and wellness. While the survey – called the Consumer Health Mindset survey* – focused on large employers, the information is largely applicable to medium- and small-sized employers, as well.

The report analyzed the responses of employees who work at organizations with strong cultures of health – or organizations that prioritize and encourage healthy behaviors in the workplace – and compared them to employees’ responses in organizations that do not.

Based on survey analysis, employees who work in strong cultures of health were more likely to say they have control over their health than those who work at companies where it is less of a priority (75 percent versus 63 percent). In addition, they were less likely to report that stress has a negative impact on their work (25 percent versus 49 percent). The report also showed a link between strong health cultures and general happiness. Sixty-six percent of employees in strong health cultures say they are extremely or very happy with their lives compared to just 32 percent of those in weak health cultures.

 Small efforts can produce large returns

There are many ways for employers to foster a culture of health and wellness. This month, we’ll focus on how employer encouragement and commitment focused on charity walks, runs and other athletic events can benefit employee morale, improve teamwork, boost health and wellness, and do good by increasing participation, raising awareness and raising funds for important charities and health-related benefit activities.

Now is the time to research and sign-up for a variety of charity events held in the spring across Connecticut. Employers should encourage their employees to find the events and activities they’d most like to support or participate in, and then – through financial underwriting, time for practice and involvement, sponsorship, or general cheerleading – make it easy for them to follow through, either individually or as teams. There also are non-athletic activities, such as helping Fidelco raise, train, maintain and support guide dogs for the blind – that bring people together and promote teamwork by working toward a common cause.

To get you started, here is a small listing of several popular and well-known charitable events held annually in Connecticut. Whether you support these or many other worthwhile charitable options, now’s the time to start. Choose one or more that work for you and your staff, get involved, and everyone wins!

The March of Dimes

The Multiple Sclerosis Foundation

Fidelco

Easter Seals

Relay for Life

Komen for the Cure

 

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*For more information on the Consumer Health Mindset survey, visit www.aon.com/consumerhealthmindset.

If you’re not enjoying the benefits of a wellness program at your company, join CBIA Healthy Connections at your company’s next renewal. It’s free as part of your participation in CBIA Health Connections!