About Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Let’s face it, most of us push ourselves too hard and burn the candle at both ends — as well as in the middle. We work a ton, chase the kids and animals, and prowl the grocery store at night. We run around days and weekends, go out for adult play, stay up late, and simply don’t get enough sleep.

Of course we’re tired. Even if we try to eat healthfully, exercise regularly and get better-than-average sleep, fatigue may set in. It could be stress related, a nutritional deficiency, or poor sleep hygiene ranging from sleep apnea to bad late-night eating habits. Sleep supplements and more rest may help; but what happens when nothing appears to be working and the fatigue gets so bad that it interferes with your job, your family or school time, and causes you to make mistakes, or worse, endanger yourself or others?

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), sometimes called myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), is a condition that makes you feel so tired that you can’t do all of your normal, daily activities. There are other symptoms too, but being very tired is the main one. Some people have severe fatigue and other symptoms for many years.

Your being tired isn’t just in your head . . . it may be your body’s reaction to a variety of factors. CFS is not well understood — most experts now believe that it is a separate illness with its own set of symptoms.

Most CFS patients have some form of sleep dysfunction. Common sleep complaints include difficulty falling asleep, hypersomnia (extreme sleepiness), frequent awakening, intense and vivid dreaming, restless legs, and nocturnal myoclonus (night-time muscular spasm). Most CFS patients report that they feel less refreshed and restored after sleep than they felt before they became ill.

Doctors don’t know what causes CFS. Sometimes it begins after a viral infection, but there is no proof of any connection. It’s likely that a number of factors or triggers come together to cause CFS, but since there are no tests for CFS, it is difficult to determine. Because of this, many people have trouble accepting their disease or getting their friends and family to do so.

Extreme tiredness, or fatigue, is the main symptom. If you have CFS:

  • You may feel exhausted all or much of the time.
  • You may have problems sleeping. Or you may wake up feeling tired or not rested.
  • It may be harder for you to think clearly, to concentrate, and to remember things.
  • You may also have headaches, muscle and joint pain, a sore throat, and tender glands in your neck or armpits.
  • Your symptoms may flare up after a mental or physical activity that used to be no problem for you. You may feel drained or exhausted.

Depression is common with CFS, and it can make your other symptoms worse. Since there are not tests for CFS, doctors can diagnose it only by ruling out other possible causes of your fatigue. And since so many other health problems can cause fatigue, most people with fatigue have something other than chronic fatigue syndrome.

Doctors can help people with CFS adopt good sleep habits. Patients are advised to practice standard sleep hygiene techniques, such as:

  • Establish a regular bedtime routine
  • Avoid napping during the day
  • Incorporate an extended wind-down period
  • Use the bed only for sleep and sex
  • Schedule regular sleep and wake times
  • Control noise, light, and temperature
  • Avoid caffeine, alcohol, and tobacco
  • Try light exercise and stretching earlier in the day, at least four hours before bedtime, because this may also improve sleep.

While there is no treatment for CFS itself, many of its symptoms can be treated. A good relationship with your doctor is important. That’s because the two of you have to work together to find a combination of medicines and behavior changes that will help you get better. Some trial and error may be needed, because no single combination of treatments works for everyone. If you believe you may have CFS, speak with your physician as soon as possible, and consider meeting with a behavioral health counselor as well.

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Be sure to check out the CBIA Healthy Connections wellness program at your company’s next renewal. It’s free as part of your participation in CBIA Health Connections!

Getting healthier is all in the wrist

When we were kids, pedometers were pretty cool . . . right up there with Dick Tracy two-way communication wristwatches, which weren’t real, but we knew they would be, some day. That day came and went with a yawn – people (the Boomers) really didn’t care that much. But then millennials took over the world, geeky became trendy, mobile phones changed our universe irrevocably, and personal fitness took center stage. So the marketing wizards figured out how to put chic back on our wrist and in our pockets by combining technology, health and wellness, and 20-somethings’ love of gadgets.

One of the oldest fitness gadgets is the pedometer. This simple device counts a person’s steps by detecting the motion of his or her hands or hips. Used originally by sports and physical fitness enthusiasts, pedometers are popular as an everyday exercise counter and motivator.

Today there are apps included on your mobile devices such as Apple Health for iOS and Google Fit for Android. And you can download even more apps to measure heart rate, track calories, set calendars, and engage step counters. There are related yoga and meditation apps, and apps for tracking where and how long you run, how many times you hydrated, calorie counters, when you should expect your period, when you took your medicine, how long you slept, and much more.

Function has replaced style for devices worn on the wrist. Devices like the Fitbit – which basically are just fancy pedometers – track steps, though the more sophisticated ones can detect things like heart rate, and sleep (how often you wake, tossing and turning, etc.). These can be synced to your phone and/or computer for tracking and analyzing data. Other popular wrist-worn devices include those from Jawbone, Garmin, Mio, and even Microsoft. The list continues to grow.

Finally, there also are “smart scales,” weight counters you step on, just like in the old days. These use WiFi and Bluetooth technology to sync weight results with your tablet, computer, phone or device. This allows you to integrate results in tracking and reporting programs. These modern scales are especially useful for helping physicians monitor weight loss or gain for chronically ill patients, shut-ins or people who can’t easily get to medical facilities. The results are sent via phone lines to a monitoring location, where technicians and nurses can identify red flags and call the patient or his or her doctor for an intervention.

The bottom line is that anything that helps you exercise more, set goals and measure your progress is good. But trends change, and people lose interest in their devices as new ones come along, and when they see it still requires work. And, sure, you could simply write down your numbers on a pad . . .  but what fun is that?

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Be sure to check out the CBIA Healthy Connections wellness program at your company’s next renewal. It’s free as part of your participation in CBIA Health Connections!

Fending off the Zika virus

Thanks to the incessant coverage of the U.S. presidential nominating process, the Zika virus alarm bells being sounded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have been temporarily overshadowed. But we are getting closer to the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro this August. In addition to the superb athletics, people will be buzzing about Zika, which has been far more widespread in South America than in North America. Cases have been reported here in Connecticut now, and people have to be cautious and concerned.

The Zika virus is spread to people primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes aegypti mosquito. While this mosquito species is not currently present in Connecticut, a closely related species, Ae. albopictus, the Asian tiger mosquito, and related species are and may become carriers of the disease in Connecticut.

The Ae. aegypti, also common known as the Yellow fever mosquito, is found throughout tropical regions of the world and are the same mosquitoes that spread dengue and chikungunya viruses. Mosquitoes become infected with the Zika virus when they bite a person already infected with the virus. Infected mosquitoes can then spread the virus to other people through bites.

Symptoms include fever, rash, joint pain, and conjunctivitis (red eyes). According to the CDC, illness is usually mild with symptoms lasting several days to a week — deaths are rare. There is no vaccine to prevent or medicine to treat Zika virus infection; however there is medication to treat some of the symptoms.

People are cautioned to contact their health care provider if they develop symptoms after returning from areas where Zika virus has been identified.  Of enormous concern, Zika virus can spread from a pregnant woman to her fetus, which can cause serious birth defects. Because of this, pregnant women should not travel to areas where Zika is present. Zika virus can also be spread from men to women by sexual contact.

Zika virus was first discovered in 1947 and is named after the Zika forest in Uganda. In 1952, the first human cases of Zika were detected and since then, outbreaks of Zika have been reported in tropical Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Islands. Zika outbreaks have probably occurred in many locations. In May 2015, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) issued an alert regarding the first confirmed Zika virus infection in Brazil, and on Feb 1, 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared Zika virus a public health emergency of international concern. Transmission has been reported in many other countries and territories, especially in Latin America. Brazil has confirmed 2,844 cases of Zika in pregnant women.

Avoid infection by preventing mosquito bites. Use insect repellent according to label instructions, wear long-sleeved shirts, long pants and hats, empty any items around your property that can hold water, and use air conditioning or window/door screens. It is important to practice these protective measures when traveling to areas where Zika virus is found, and these are useful steps to help reduce mosquito and insect bites in general.

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Be sure to check out the CBIA Healthy Connections wellness program at your company’s next renewal. It’s free as part of your participation in CBIA Health Connections!

Getting comfortable at work

How you feel about your work place, and your work space, has as much to do with productivity, teamwork and improved communication as it does comfort. Employees spend a lot of time at work, and the composition of their working, meeting, and common areas says much about an organization’s culture, values and health.

People like a flexible work culture that helps each employee personalize his or her experience as much as possible. Business owners are finding that more flexibility leads to greater retention, better production and improved customer and employee satisfaction. All of this leads to a better bottom line, as well.

Not everyone works the same way. While some people may prefer a constant buzz around the office, others like quiet spaces to concentrate. It’s a bonus when an employer can match someone’s needs to how – and what — they produce, or to the way they like to work. Varied spaces, when it’s possible, enhance workplace wellness and make offices more inviting.

Customized work spaces can have lounge chairs and couches as well as traditional desks. Mixing it up in the workplace gives employees something different to look at every day instead of a boring, neutral-colored walled cubicle. Empty or unused spaces can be retrofitted as open conference areas, meeting rooms, or gathering places for brainstorming, quality checks, or coffee, juice and snack stations. Plants can be added for warmth and color. The idea is to think creatively, and the more you can involve employees in planning how to use office and warehouse space, the more engaged they will be.

Workers whose companies allow them to help decide when, where, and how they work are more likely to be satisfied with their jobs, perform better, and view their company as more innovative than competitors that don’t offer such choices. We can’t always have what we want, but trying to find a compromise – and remaining open to employee ideas and suggestions – goes a long way.

Other simple steps can be taken to improve life in the office, on the plant floor or in other working areas. These include:

  • Place desks near natural light, which helps keep us better attuned to our own circadian rhythms and is a mood enhancer
  • Choose bright and welcoming artwork and colors
  • Allow employees to decorate their own cubicles, offices or work spaces, and to contribute to decorating the office, meeting rooms and common areas
  • Create open spaces throughout the work area by lowering the sides of cubicles and creating café-style seating for mingling and working
  • Reduce clutter so people don’t feel hemmed in, and to reduce visual chaos
  • Involve employees by asking them how they work best, what currently helps or doesn’t, and by offering them a decision-making role in rearranging work areas
  • The typical American sits an average of 9.3 hours a day – which is far longer than most of us sleep each day. Consider “walking or standing meetings,” especially for smaller groups, and when possible, take the meeting outdoors.

The more we can give employees a say in creating a comfortable, effective workplace for themselves and their peers, the happier they’ll be.  Less stress means greater satisfaction and increased productivity and retention. Little that we do in life is “one size fits all.” So the workplace shouldn’t try to be that, either.

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If you’re not enjoying the benefits of a wellness program at your company, join CBIA Healthy Connections at your company’s next renewal. It’s free as part of your participation in CBIA Health Connections!