Autumn Fitness Includes Walking Our Way to Better Health

Autumn in New England is, for many of us, as good as it gets — warm days, crisp evenings, the smell of wood fires, pumpkins and freshly picked apples, breathtakingly colorful, scenic panoramas in every direction…what could be bad? Well, the days are getting shorter, the evenings colder and winter isn’t far away — but let’s stay focused on the positive, okay?

This is a great time of year to be outdoors walking, riding and hiking, working in the yard and enjoying the fresh air and beautiful scenery. As the cooler weather approaches it may portend the limitation of certain outdoor activities, but as is said, “When one door closes, another opens.” In this case, it’s the opportunity to continue our commitment to improved health and fitness, and to plan activities that will prevent us from winter stagnation. That may include many kinds of indoor fitness activities such as aerobic workouts, spinning, dance, yoga, swimming, athletics and much more, but also includes outdoor recreation such as hiking, bicycling and sports that can be practiced until the big chill sets in.

Dressing properly for the cooler weather is critical, as is proper hydration. It’s also important to remember to protect ourselves from damaging ultraviolet rays. However warming and enriching, sunshine damages unprotected skin all year long, and we need to continue using sunscreen and protecting our eyes as well, even in the cooler months.

Autumn also is a good time to moderate our diets, and a chance to implement good nutritional practices that may help reduce the seasonal gluttony (and related guilt) that accompanies the rapidly approaching holidays. Taking the time now to focus on sugar, fat, salt and carbohydrate intake will leave us in far better shape come January!

Walk the walk                                                                         

One of the simplest and most beneficial outdoor wellness activities is walking. This valuable exercise is good for our hearts, breathing, blood pressure, circulation, cholesterol levels, joint health and much more. If dressed for the weather with clothes that wick or keep moisture off our skin, we can walk all-year-round. And when it comes to fitness value it doesn’t really matter where we walk, as long as it’s done regularly and for long-enough distances and time periods to make a positive health difference.

According to a recent national survey conducted in August 2013 by GfK Research on behalf of Kaiser Permanente, Americans know that walking is good for their overall health, but many are not walking enough to meet recommended guidelines for health benefits. According to the survey, 30 percent of Americans said they walk more than they did five years ago, 35 percent are walking less and 32 percent are walking about the same amount. One-third of those surveyed said they don’t walk for 10 minutes at a time over the course of a week. In addition, 31 percent of those who walk do so for less than 150 minutes per week, which is the minimal threshold for physical activity established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Nationwide, 94 percent of those surveyed said they view walking as good for their health and 79 percent acknowledge they should walk more. At least nine in 10 respondents agreed that walking is a good way to lose weight, maintain a healthy weight and can help prevent heart disease. In addition, 73 percent said they believe their children should walk more. Respondents also view walking as a good way to reduce stress and combat depression. More than eight in 10 Americans said walking can reduce feelings of depression and 87 percent said walking helps reduce anxiety.

Survey respondents don’t necessarily view the CDC’s guidelines as difficult to meet. Half said it would not be difficult to meet the CDC’s guidelines of walking 150 minutes per week. Nearly six in 10 respondents also said they would walk more if their doctor told them to.

When asked why they don’t walk more, those surveyed cited lack of time and energy. Not living in communities where they can walk to services, shops, school and work is also a deterrent. Four in 10 describe their neighborhood as “not very” or “not at all walkable.”

So, if we know that walking is good for us, and we know we don’t do it often enough, what can we do to change this paradigm? Setting personal, achievable goals is the first priority.

Walking a minimum of 30 minutes a day, five days a week can help address chronic conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, obesity and depression that limit our quality of life and contribute to the escalating cost of healthcare. Everyone can benefit from walking, regardless of age. It can be done alone, with a partner, or in groups.  Depending on where you live, and when you go to school or work, you can establish your own walking routine any time of day or night.

Set simple goals:  Plan to walk every day, or at least five days a week, at a time that works best for you. If something interferes with your walking schedule or the weather is lousy, walk later that day or the next day when it’s more convenient. Great walking venues include parks, schools, athletic tracks, established walking trails or your own neighborhood. City streets, shopping malls and quiet, safer roads can suffice, as well. Keep a written or electronic record of your walking so you can track your progress, and reward yourself when you hit a personal milestone of your own choosing. Encourage a friend, child or work associate to join you, and see walking as a critical daily activity, not as elective.

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Be sure to check out the CBIA Healthy Connections wellness program at your company’s next renewal. It’s free as part of your participation in CBIA Health Connections!