Are You a Candidate for Medical Marijuana?

Though the debate about the use of medical marijuana continues in many states and in Washington, DC, close to half of the country — including Connecticut — has legalized the use of cannabis and its cannabinoids for medicinal purposes for treating a variety of conditions.

Use must be approved by a Connecticut-licensed physician or an Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN), who must write a prescription that only can be filled at a licensed dispensary using products produced locally by a handful of State-approved growers.

To qualify, a patient needs to be diagnosed as having one of the following debilitating medical conditions that is specifically identified in the law, including:  Cancer, glaucoma, HIV, AIDS, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, certain types of damage to the nervous tissue of the spinal cord, epilepsy, cachexia, wasting syndrome, Crohn’s disease or post-traumatic stress disorder. Other approved medicinal uses include:

  • Sickle Cell Disease
  • Post Laminectomy Syndrome with Chronic Radiculopathy
  • Severe Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis
  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
  • Ulcerative Colitis
  • Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

The laws regarding medical marijuana are fluid and constantly changing, as a board of physicians and legislators reflect on patient needs, other available drugs and therapies, and new research. The following additional medical conditions are now covered for patients over 18 (excluding inmates confined in a correctional institution of facility under the Department of Correction, regardless of their medical condition), although patients under 18 also qualify, with certain restrictions and requirements:

  • Cerebral Palsy
  • Cystic Fibrosis
  • Irreversible Spinal Cord Injury with Objective Neurological Indication of Intractable Spasticity
  • Terminal Illness Requiring End-Of-Life Care
  • Uncontrolled Intractable Seizure Disorder

The first step is to make an appointment with the physician treating you for the debilitating condition for which you seek to use medical marijuana. You will not be able to register in the system until the Department receives a certification from your physician or APRN that you have been diagnosed with a condition that qualifies for the use of medical marijuana and that, in his or her opinion, the potential benefits of the palliative use of marijuana would likely outweigh the health risks.

Patients with a prescription for medical marijuana need to complete an application with the State Department of Consumer Protection, which oversees this program in Connecticut. The process involves providing proof the patient still lives in Connecticut; an updated photograph; certifications that have to be completed online or in writing; and the payment of a program fee. Medical marijuana in Connecticut is not a covered health insurance benefit.

Qualifying patient applications take between two to three weeks to process. Upon approval of the application, a temporary certificate is emailed to the patient. This temporary certificate is valid for 30 days from the approval date of the application. The temporary certificate will allow patients to use their selected dispensary facility while their permanent Medical Marijuana Certificate is being mailed.

Patients must visit their selected dispensary in advance of filling their prescription as part of the screening process. Then, once approved, they can fill their prescription by accessing medical marijuana in a variety of forms and strengths. This includes product for smoking for those who might have trouble ingesting this medicine, or who prefer this delivery method. Prescriptions also cover the use of liquids, lozenges, edibles and other styles.

Though legalized, there are rules restricting use. For example, the law prohibits ingesting marijuana in a bus or any moving vehicle; in the workplace; on any school grounds (public or private), dormitory, college or university property; in any public place; or in the presence of anyone under 18. It also prohibits any use of palliative marijuana that endangers the health or well-being of another person, other than the patient or primary caregiver.

Finally, not every physician or APRN may be willing to write a prescription for medical marijuana, despite legalization. The Department of Consumer Protection does not require physicians or hospitals to recognize marijuana as an appropriate medical treatment in general or for any specific patient. If you believe that your physician is not providing you with the best medical care for your condition, then you may want to consider working with a different physician.

For more information, visit and look for the section for medical marijuana under Laws & Regulations.


Be sure to check out the CBIA Healthy Connections wellness program at your company’s next renewal. It’s free as part of your participation in CBIA Health Connections!

The More You Know, the Better You’ll Feel

Informed patients make the best consumers of medical care. But with so much information available from a wide variety of sources, as well as age and cultural differences and cost and access issues, becoming a good medical consumer isn’t as easy as buying groceries or shopping for a new lawnmower.

Access to reliable, accurate information is one challenge. Another is a patient’s ability, or willingness, to ask informed questions and educate themselves about their disease, illness, condition or surgery. Those questions can range from “Why are you suggesting this procedure or medicine?”  to “What are the costs?” But the grey area in between is enormous. People may be intimidated by medical professionals, afraid of sounding ignorant, or uncomfortable asking questions. The age of the patient, and the age of the physician or technician can be a factor, as well as gender and ethnicity.

There is a lot of quality information available online. Additionally, most large insurance companies have comprehensive websites, and many have information lines accessible by phone or email. Some insurance provider websites also provide cost-comparison tools, though not for all services and procedures, and sometimes just for Medicare services.

Employers should encourage their employees to learn as much as possible about treatments for an illness or disease, or before having surgery.  For example, many hospitals offer nurse navigators to help patients prepare for surgeries involving joint replacement (such as hips, knees and shoulders), and maternity and gastro-intestinal (GI) departments also offer materials, videos, booklets and informational forums.

Disease-management programs have become popular over the past decade. If you suffer from heart or respiratory disease, diabetes or other chronic conditions, specialized programs now exist for answering questions, and for measuring weight, blood pressure and blood sugar. Remote monitoring can involve electronic scales that register and communicate your weight loss or gain to offices staffed by technicians and nurses located anywhere in the country. They review the results, and if they see changes, can then call the patient or the patient’s physician to set up an appointment or recommend an intervention. Oftentimes, dedicated nurse hotlines exist for the patient, and he or she may be asked to complete periodic assessments, or they may receive regular calls to check on their status, to schedule appointments or to offer suggestions.

Employees who are not taking advantage of these programs are missing out on useful, important services that are included in their benefit package. Employers can remind employees about these programs, or encourage them to look into every possible resource prior to a planned surgery or maternity, or while recovering from an illness.

Hospitals also have interpreters available on staff, via phone or online to ensure that non-English-speaking patients’ questions are answered completely or clearly. And for some patients, a medical professional who looks or sounds like them can be the difference between going into a procedure with confidence or with fear – or not taking the risk at all.

Libraries now have extensive medical and healthcare sections. Additionally, many physician practices have created patient portals where you can access information about appointments, tests, results and recommendations, ask questions online or seek other information. These portals are confidential and easy to use, requiring online access only.

Finally, if you have questions for your doctor or nurse, you should ask them – call or request a face-to-face meeting and learn what you need to feel confident, less afraid and informed. Bring another person to act as a second set of ears, if necessary. Either way, if the office resists, it may be time to find another practice that welcomes your inquiries.

Understanding as much as possible about your healthcare helps you maintain control over your body, and over your wallet. The more active a role you take in your personal health, the better the results are likely to be.


If you’re not enjoying the benefits of a wellness program at your company, join CBIA Healthy Connections at your company’s next renewal. It’s free as part of your participation in CBIA Health Connections!

Teams that play together work better

For many active, over-extended or retired weekend warriors, it’s hard driving past softball games, volleyball or tennis matches, 5K charity walks or groups of bicyclists spinning down paved bike paths without feeling wistful. It’s already June, the weather is finally warm and our bodies could really use the exercise and mental release. But we’re busy with work and life and can barely make time to get to the gym and see our family and friends, let alone go play.

Yet going to play and exercising are crucial for our mental and physical health.  For millions of American workers, the opportunity to combine physical activity within or related to the workplace environment has long been a staple of progressive cultures. This healthy practice is catching on in small and large organizations nationwide as increased awareness of health and wellness becomes integrated in team environments. Savvy employers recognize athletic activity as a tool for increased productivity, stress reduction, improved morale, team building and a path to overall wellness.

One CBIA Health Connections employer created a health and wellness committee to brainstorm and plan activities. They linked several of their ideas to national health- and wellness-related observances. Another tied their activities to local events, charities, and parks. Many employers bring in guest presenters and instructors, or sponsor classes, health screenings, nutritional education, and internal competitions. It’s all good fun, can be used to support charitable programs, and helps build stronger workplace teams.

Every month in the United States, there are a dozen or more formally designated awareness commemorations. These provide great topics around which you, your wellness champion, management team, or staff employees can develop an action plan for one or more activities.

There’s something for everyone, ranging from high-profile cancer-awareness months for ovarian, prostrate, breast, lung and skin cancers, to fruit and vegetables “matter” month, obesity, eye and hearing care, diabetes, yoga, UV protection, blood pressure, workplace and helmet safety, immunizations, and much more.

This month is National Great Outdoors Month – there are a variety of activities planned at Connecticut State parks, perfect locations for picnics and outings. And even though it’s not even summer yet, it’s never too early to begin planning for the autumn and winter – by building a schedule well in advance, you can encourage more employee involvement in planning and implementing activities that ultimately improve teamwork, enhance morale and productivity and support health and wellness.

Healthier employees are happier employees. They get sick less often, suffer from fewer incidences of chronic diseases, and have reduced absenteeism and sick days. By delegating – and using the many health and wellness tools available online – you can play a major role in promoting, supporting and funding health and wellness activities that feature a huge return on your investment.


If you’re not enjoying the benefits of a wellness program at your company, join CBIA Healthy Connections at your company’s next renewal. It’s free as part of your participation in CBIA Health Connections!

Engage Employees in Monthly Health Awareness Activities

Somewhere in Washington, DC, bureaucrats are hard at work reviewing requests for new awareness recognition months, weeks, and days. There already are a slew of these, many designed to raise awareness for serious diseases and illnesses like heart disease, high blood pressure, most types of cancer, diabetes, traumatic brain injury, oral and mental health, and dozens of chronic illnesses.

There also are recognition periods for lesser-known or rare diseases, social causes, and special events like Great Outdoors Month, and Fruit and Vegetables Matter Month. Then, it expands widely from there, with recognition for everything from National Red Meat month, to Don’t Fry Day, Dump your Boyfriend Week, and months dedicated to condoms, grapefruits, biking, and riptide awareness.

The point isn’t to question whether or not these are important and worthwhile tributes, but to acknowledge that there’s something for everyone – and that represents opportunities for small businesses to embrace days, weeks, and months dedicated to loving dogs, drinking wine, eating chocolate, or disease prevention and staying healthy through improved nutrition and exercise.

Employees embrace a wide range of personal interests and activities. If your goal is to help improve workplace health and wellness, enhance teamwork, boost morale, and increase employee involvement, tapping into awareness recognition is an easy, fun, and interactive way to engage employees.

Many organizations create voluntary health and wellness committees tasked with identifying causes that appeal to employees, and then determining how education, outreach, and interactive activities will be coordinated. Some employers tie their activities to local events, charities, and parks. Program suggestions cover the gamut from inviting guest speakers and fitness experts, hosting healthy eating activities, running screening clinics for blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar and flu shots, swapping recipes, participating in walks, runs, and bike races, losing weight, quitting smoking, and just about anything creative, enthusiastic people can think about.

This month alone, here are just some of the more serious national health observances taking place:

  • Skin Cancer and UV Awareness Month
  • Mental Health Month
  • National Blood Pressure Awareness Month
  • Healthy Vision Awareness Month
  • Arthritis Awareness Month
  • Lyme Disease Awareness Month
  • Celiac Disease Awareness Month

There are plenty more, too – pick the ones that work for you and your team.

By simply searching on the Internet for “national health awareness months,” you’ll discover a plethora of options. And when companies underwrite group activities, offer incentives, sponsor friendly competitions, and recognize participation, employers can demonstrate leadership, interest in their employees’ wellness, and their commitment to creating and maintaining a healthy workplace.


Be sure to check out the CBIA Healthy Connections wellness program at your company’s next renewal. It’s free as part of your participation in CBIA Health Connections!

Living Life on the Sunny Side of the Street

When people are acting negatively – critical about themselves and others, pessimistic, always seeing the darker side of things, constantly questioning motives, always assuming the worst – it wears on the people around them and on them, as well.  Negative people get sick more often and take longer to recover, while optimistic people tend to be less sick and more resilient.

Research indicates that psychological factors influence cardiovascular disease, morbidity, and mortality. Persistent negative behavior such as depression, anxiety or anger, and cynical, hostile attitudes toward others have been linked as early indicators of future heart disease. On the other hand, dispositional optimism or the general feeling that good things rather than bad will resolve a difficult situation or generally prevail in the future, have been associated with reduced risk of mortality.

Published last year in the American Journal of Epidemiology, researchers found a definitive association between a positive sense of well-being and better health. This study used data from 70,021 women who were part of a long-running nurses’ health study. It gauged their level of optimism through a questionnaire originally conducted in 2004. The average age of respondents was 70 years old.

Then the researchers tracked deaths among the women from 2006 to 2012. They found that after controlling for factors including age, race, educational level, and marital status, the women who were most optimistic were 29% less likely to die during the six-year study follow-up than the least optimistic. That reduced risk was seen in cancer (16% lower), heart disease (38%), stroke (39%), respiratory disease (37%), and infection (52%).

When the researchers ran additional analyses controlling for existing health conditions such as high cholesterol, diabetes, and cancer, the risk of dying was 27% lower among the most optimistic women. When controlling for health behaviors like smoking and exercise, 14% lower. And when controlling for all those factors, the risk of dying was still 9% lower among the most optimistic women.

People who are more optimistic tend to have healthier behaviors when it comes to diet, exercise, and tobacco use. It’s also possible that more optimistic people cope better, create contingency plans, plan for future challenges, and accept what can’t be changed. This optimism may have a direct impact on improved immune function or lower levels of inflammation.

In another study, doctors evaluated 309 middle-aged patients who were scheduled to undergo coronary artery bypass surgery. In addition to a complete pre-operative physical exam, each patient underwent a psychological evaluation designed to measure optimism, depression, neuroticism, and self-esteem. The researchers tracked all the patients for six months after surgery. When they analyzed the data, they found that optimists were only half as likely as pessimists to require re-hospitalization. In a similar study of 298 angioplasty patients, optimism was also protective; over a six-month period, pessimists were three times more likely than optimists to have heart attacks or require repeat angioplasties or bypass operations.

And finally, an American study of 2,564 men and women who were 65 and older also found that optimism is good for blood pressure. People with positive emotions had lower blood pressures than those with a negative outlook. On average, the people with the most positive emotions had the lowest blood pressures.

Can we learn to be positive?

So if having a positive attitude can help reduce illness and prolong life, why aren’t we all happy, and what might we do to become less pessimistic and negative? The first question is the harder to answer. We are complex psychological beings, products of our upbringing, genetics, hardships, and positive and negative experiences. We’ve been shaped and influenced by many people and situations, and we learned good and bad behaviors through the years by observation and reaction, and as protection.

But there are things we can do to help move ourselves into a more positive, optimistic mindset.

For example:

  • Notice negativity. Listen to what you and others say and how negative it is. Track your own thoughts on a daily basis and notice the negative assumptions and conclusions that you draw, because identifying our own negativity is essential to change.
  • When you find yourself saying something negative, think of something positive to say.
  • Search for positive aspects of situations. Most situations can be seen in both a positive and negative light. You just have to find the positive one and keep reminding yourself of it in order to eventually believe it.
  • Think of someone you know who has a positive outlook on life and ask yourself what that person would do or think in particular situations. Then try to think that way too.
  • Give others positive feedback. Even if someone has done something poorly, there has to be some aspect of it that is good. If you can find this, your view will be more positive and the other person may feel encouraged to continue.
  • Give yourself positive feedback and notice when you discount or minimize your successes. Pessimists feel uncomfortable with good things and often fear disappointing others by acknowledging their own strengths. Learn to just say thank you if someone (including yourself) gives you positive feedback.
  • Identify why you feel negative. Does it provide protection against disappointment? Does it help you not to get hurt? Do you think that it helps you to plan for possible challenges? We often think that pessimism and worry are helpful but this is not true. We can learn to handle disappointment, hurt, and challenges if we were not bogged down by anxiety and negativity.
  • Take the risk of being positive and see how it feels. It takes a long time to learn negativity and will take a while to learn optimism.

Positive thinking and being will help you lead a longer, healthier life. It may take practice, but what do you have to lose, other than the negative attitude?

Be sure to check out the CBIA Healthy Connections wellness program at your company’s next renewal. It’s free as part of your participation in CBIA Health Connections!

Stress at Work Is Killing Us

Whether home or at work, at school, shopping, or driving, there’s no shortage of things to stress us out. Our ability to cope, get along with others, get things done efficiently, and be reasonable often hinges on how we manage that stress. Those coping mechanisms have a lot to do with how well our days go and how we get along with family and friends. But when it comes to work, there’s a greater price to pay. Not managing stress effectively costs employers billions of dollars annually in healthcare-related expenses, lost-work hours, and reduced productivity due to illness, depression, accidents, turnover, and worker burnout.

According to research by the American Psychological Association’s (APA) Center for Organizational Excellence, more than one-third (35%) of American workers experience chronic work stress, with low salaries, lack of opportunities for advancement, and heavy workloads topping the list of contributing factors. Stress in the workplace, researchers found, manifests itself in increased absenteeism and presenteeism (coming to work, but not achieving expectations, or working to potential), lower productivity, and increased service errors.

Stress also is a contributor to high blood pressure and other diseases. When we’re frustrated, depressed, or under tremendous pressure at work or at home, we tend to eat poorly, not exercise, and otherwise tax our bodies. Links have been established between stress and our body’s production of excess cholesterol. Stress also interferes with our normal sleep, which causes fatigue and makes us irritable and more susceptible to illness. When unchecked, stress interferes with our general quality of life, and can affect our relationships, productivity, customer service, teamwork, safety, and quality.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), work-related stress is the physical and emotional damage that occurs due to a mismatch between work requirements and the resources, needs, and capabilities of workers. Currently, 40% of American workers say that their jobs are very or extremely stressful. At the same time, 26% of employees say they are very often burned out, or stressed at the workplace. Twenty-nine percent of workers say that their jobs are extremely stressful, and 25% report that their jobs are the leading causes of stress in their lives.

How is that affecting them physically? CDC statistics say that seven out of 10 workers say they experience stress-related psychological symptoms regularly, and close to eight out of 10 employees regularly encounter physical symptoms associated with stress. To avoid workplace stress, 60% of 26,000 U.S. workers surveyed said they would opt for a fresh career start. This dissatisfaction on the job is costing American employers $300 billion annually on employee healthcare and employee absence costs.

Why so much workplace stress?

If you’ve ever worked for or with other people, you probably can answer this question yourself.

Workload accounts for 46% of all workplace stress incidents, and “people issues” account for 28% of stress at work problems. Additionally, juggling work/personal life challenges accounts for 20% of stress incidents reported by American workers, while lack of job security is the fourth-leading cause of stress at the workplace.

The symptoms of worrying, anxiety, and stress at work result in back pain, fatigue, stomach ailments, headaches, teeth grinding, and changes in sex drive. It reduces immunity to disease, and leaves workers unable to sleep well at night due to worrying about their jobs. And it’s costing employers an estimated $10 billion annually in productivity losses alone.

All in all, it sounds pretty dire. Yet we have to work, we have to get along with our co-workers, bosses, and customers, and we have to remain focused on quality, service, and productivity. So how can employers help address the issues that cause this detrimental behavior and side effects, and improve outcomes?

Organizations that have implemented measures to address burnout have a staff turnover rate of just 6%, which is low compared to the national average of 38%. Additionally, in progressive-thinking companies, the rate of staff reporting “chronic work stress” stands at 19% compared to the national average of 35%. Employees at the same organizations registered higher job satisfaction scores, meaning they were unlikely to seek greener pastures elsewhere.

Tips for managing workplace stress

Humans are complicated – there are no easy answers or magic bullets. But based on research, an important first step is promoting a healthy work/life balance. Progressive organizations offer telecommuting, paid time off, and flex time perks. Employee recognition strategies including profit-sharing programs, bonuses, and cost-of-living salary raises. Organizing staff retreats, interacting with staff to learn more about their problems, and monitoring job satisfaction helps, as does providing workers with regular career growth and development opportunities.

While the work has to get done and get done on time, fatigue plays an enormous role in reduced workplace productivity. While napping in one’s car is helpful when coping with exhaustion, some employers provide rest or nap lounges with couches, reduced lighting, and soft music. Ensuring that employees get adequate time for stretching, moving around, breaks, and for lunch or dinner is critical.

Additionally, time during the day for recreation – walks, runs, athletics, bicycling, working out – helps people manage stress and keep themselves healthier. That could be as simple as having a fitness room, basketball or volleyball court at the workplace, or encouraging employees to take a walk or go to the gym at times that work best for them and fit within their work requirements.

Bringing in experts on nutrition, fitness, yoga, massage, and other forms of relaxation or wellness education is inexpensive and helpful. And engaging employees in team problem-solving, or creating and empowering recreation, communication, health and wellness, and “fun” committees goes a long way toward improving morale, teamwork and productivity.

Ultimately, we all have to find ways to deal with our own stress, and the stress that accompanies most jobs. But recognizing the signs of worker stress and acknowledging the importance of providing creative and healthy outlets for employees will help reduce some of the factors that are heavily taxing workers and costing employers a fortune, and employees their health.

Raise Your Glasses… Then Place Them Back Down

Think what you will about alcohol use, but a culture of drinking is part of our heritage and lifestyle. While many people abstain due to health, religious, or moral concerns, millions of Americans and people around the globe imbibe socially, use wine in religious ceremonies, binge drink, or abuse alcohol for a variety of reasons varying from habit to pain relief to genetics.

Many people enjoy the experience of being lightly intoxicated including reduced inhibitions and stimulation, and drinking is a normal part of many of our every-day rituals and customs here in the United States and around the world.

But drinking too much – on a single occasion or over time – can have serious consequences for our health. These consequences go far beyond having a headache and a hangover that make us uncomfortable but go away relatively quickly.

April is National Alcohol Awareness Month. Most people recognize that excessive drinking can lead to accidents and dependence, and can cause liver disease. But that’s only part of the story. Unlike other drugs, alcohol disperses in all body tissues and therefore has the potential to harm many organ systems. Alcohol abuse can damage organs, weaken the immune system, and contribute to a variety of cancers. Plus, much like smoking, alcohol affects different people differently. Genes, environment, and even diet can play a role in whether you develop an alcohol-related disease.

On the flip side, some people may actually benefit from drinking alcohol in small quantities. Alcohol’s effect on our heart is the best example of alcohol’s dual effects. Drinking a lot over a long time or too much on a single occasion can cause heart problems including high blood pressure, strokes, arrhythmia, and cardiomyopathy, a condition that causes our heart muscle to weaken and droop. But research also shows that healthy people who drink moderate amounts of alcohol (such as red wine) may have a lower risk of developing coronary artery disease than people who never drink at all.

Putting drinking in perspective

If you enjoy an alcoholic beverage once in a great while, you’re in good company: According to the 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), seven out of 10 Americans report drinking alcohol at some point in the past year, and 56% drank in the past month. However, 26.9% of people ages 18 or over reported that they engaged in binge drinking, and 7% in heavy alcohol use regularly.

Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) – or problem drinking – was reported in 15.1 million adults age 18 and over, with 1.3 million Americans seeking help in treatment facilities for drinking problems. What’s even more frightening is that, according to NSDUH, 623,000 adolescents ages 12 to 17 were reported suffering from AUD, resulting in 37,000 treated at medical or rehabilitation facilities.

Approximately 90,000 people die from alcohol-related causes annually, making alcohol the fourth-leading preventable cause of death in the United States. Close to 10,000 Americans die in alcohol-related car accidents annually, and alcohol misuse costs our country approximately $250 billion in health-related expenses, lost work time, and other factors such as reduced productivity and accidents.

How alcohol hurts us

While drinking in moderation may not affect the health of our liver, heavy drinking can definitely take its toll. The liver helps rid our bodies of substances that can be dangerous, including alcohol. By breaking down alcohol, the liver produces toxic byproducts that damage liver cells, promote inflammation, and weaken the body’s natural defenses. This can make conditions ripe for disorders like steatosis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis, and dangerous inflammations like hepatitis to develop.

Pancreatic inflammations can also develop in response to drinking too much. Alcohol causes the pancreas to produce toxic substances that can eventually cause inflammation and swelling in tissues in blood vessels. This inflammation, called pancreatitis, prevents the pancreas from digesting food and converting it into fuel to power our bodies.

Aside from damaging our organs, drinking too much alcohol can also increase our risk of developing certain cancers, including those of the mouth, esophagus, pharynx, larynx, liver, and breast.

Alcohol also can weaken our immune systems, making our bodies a much easier target for disease. Drinking a lot on a single occasion slows our body’s ability to ward off infections, even up to 24 hours after getting drunk. Chronic drinkers are more likely to contract diseases like pneumonia and tuberculosis than people who do not drink too much.

So while some light to moderate drinking may not hurt you, it’s important to understand the toxic, longer-term effects of alcohol and use common sense when drinking any alcoholic beverage. We may never be a nation of teetotalers, but understanding what we put in our bodies and making smart decisions about our health will always work in our favor.

Are We Having Fun Yet?

Having fun and working successfully used to be considered incongruent. The workplace was viewed as a monument to serious business only. The standard philosophy was that safety, quality, and productivity would be negatively affected if employees were distracted and having fun instead of focusing on their work. But humor and having fun are natural human reactions. Each plays an important role in regulating interpersonal relations, for reducing stress and in helping people keep their perspective. It also serves as an invaluable team-building tool, and platform for improving morale.

Generational differences play a large role in how workers view their jobs and having fun. Millennials are more at ease with diversity, technology, and online communication than are other generations. In general, they have high expectations and seek meaning in their work, but also regard their jobs as a means to build their career résumé, rather than looking for long-term attachment or commitment to the organization that better defines the Baby Boomers.

Millennials see a stronger association between workplace fun and individual outcomes than do other generations. In fact, this age group often considers fun in the workplace a requirement, rather than a benefit, and seeks balance and synergy between their personal and work lives. In this evolving workplace model, employees expect purposefully designed fun activities that are linked to organizational outcomes like enhanced productivity, increased innovation, stronger teams and customer service, stress reduction, and improved retention.

Employees today enjoy social activities such as company-wide outings and food-related activities, internal contests, sports, and athletic competitions. Fun and inclusiveness go hand in hand, so offering special events and programs that are open to all workers is important.

Employers learned long ago the value of dress-down days and casual Fridays but since most workplaces are business casual or informal in their dress expectations, those perks are no longer seen as special. Other ideas worth considering for boosting the fun factor at work include:

  • Favorite team jersey days. Baseball favorites in this region seem to be split fairly evening between the Red Sox and the Yankees, with a smattering of Mets and other teams. Let everyone wear their colors to work and celebrate other sports as well as baseball.
  • Healthy breakfasts, lunches, or dinners, either sponsored by the employer, or have staff bring in food to share with their co-workers. Healthy recipe exchanges, a smoothie or coffee bar, and dessert station also are fun, as are barbeques in the warm weather.
  • Attend a sporting event. Offer tickets to a baseball, basketball, hockey, road race, or other sports activity locally including minor league or college sports, and open participation to all employees and possibly their families or guests.
  • Encourage team events. These can include softball, basketball, skiing, bowling, volleyball, exercise or fitness activities, charity walks, and bike rides, whatever appeals to your workforce. The buzz from these activities is bound to carry over into the office as well.
  • Establish an internal social network. While compliance and HR rules apply, people can post information, talk about service issues, make suggestions, respond to those suggestions, post funny articles, YouTube and Facebook links, and much more.
  • Host seasonal fun activities. These can be pumpkin-carving contests, events linked to the Super Bowl, World Series, or Daytona 500, or whatever floats people’s boats.
  • Encourage the creative personalization of individual work spaces. Nothing over the top, of course, but we spend a lot of time at work, so our work space should be able to reflect who we are and who or what we care for outside of work.
  • Celebrate wins. There’s nothing better than bringing people together to celebrate a successful launch, achieving a business goal, to recognize service, acknowledge awards, or to simply thank employees for their hard work and support. It should include food, special guests, premium gifts, and whatever else you or a planning group have in mind.
  • Use meetings to recognize team or individual contributions. Meetings have a purpose, but they’re also a great time for peer recognition. Celebrate one another, and consider gift cards and other informal recognition tools.
  • Create a “fun” committee. Let a group of volunteers come together to solicit ideas and plan activities that will be well received, rather than guessing what people might like. And consider giving them a small budget to help get programming off the ground.

The bottom line is that having fun at work doesn’t have to be work, or all about work. It’s about understanding people’s needs, teamwork and, literally, the bottom line.

Using Social Networks to Promote Health and Wellness

Employers understand that simply trumpeting the benefits of employee wellness programs isn’t enough to guarantee participation. In the digital age, the common wellness textbook for “Leading the Horse to Water 101” has changed. It isn’t enough to just point out the pond and extol the virtues of drinking — you have to help the thirsty find it, convince them it’s healthy, and creatively encourage them to drink from it. And since maps are practically extinct, using GPS – or some form of electronic media – will help guide your audience effectively and efficiently.

While the U.S. Department of Labor estimates that as many as half the employers with 50 or more workers offer some kind of company wellness program, most managers say that engaging employees to participate in these efforts is their greatest challenge. For smaller employers (under 50 employees), proximity may work in their behavior for traditional face-to-face wellness outreach, but employees are busier than ever, multi-tasking like crazy, and often on the run or working remotely.

The solution to reaching everyone more effectively has to include but also extend beyond the workplace. That creates a perfect opportunity for using social media. Even though companies have long frowned on having their employees access the Internet or their personal phones while working, today’s world dictates new rules. And with smart phones and other electronic devices, savvy employers and health benefits companies have 24-hour access to promote healthful programs and activities.

Online social interaction is a way of life in today’s rapidly evolving world. Social communities keep people – and in this case, employees – involved and engaged, both in and out of the workplace. In fact, robust employee wellness programs have long been credited with helping to reduce sick time, improve quality and teamwork, and enhance morale, productivity and retention.

Beyond these positive long-term results, social media also provides the extra motivation employees may need to lose weight, quit smoking, adjust their diets, spend more time exercising and to make other healthy decisions. Sharing goals is a win/win – it’s often more fun to work out, walk or pursue other wellness activities when you do it with friends and coworkers. Positive peer pressure is a strong incentive for change, and utilizing online tools should be part of your strategy as well as the use of posters, questionnaires and “live” information sessions with health and wellness experts.

The social nature of products like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram and other popular platforms can be harnessed to help people become more engaged in their wellness programs, and more successful as they try to improve their health. Other ideas that employers can consider implementing are online wellness journals, and discussion groups and progress reports that they can choose to share with friends or other individuals with the same fitness goals.

Here are some practical tips for using online tools and social media to improve health and wellness participation and results:

  • Post regular quizzes, trivia, Q&A sessions, and other interesting educational tools. You can also share helpful resources to navigate screenings, ergonomics and other health-related services provided through your business, or using outside resources.
  • Promote events and activities. Keep employees in the loop about ways they can get actively involved such as classes, news, team marathons or online meet-ups. They can even subscribe to a calendar for the latest updates.
  • Hold friendly contests, such as who can lose the most weight, walk the furthest or visit the gym most often. The competition can be individual or team-based between departments (or even businesses). You can also create daily or weekly challenges in the office, where participants can share their results.
  • Use third-party platforms for a more personalized experience. Third-party apps like FitBit or Keas are great ways to expand employee engagement with integrated sensors, devices, and biometric tracking – all with private access.
  • Create groups or boards. Wellness engagement needs to be long-term, so keeping the dialogue going is crucial. Give your employees space to discuss health issues, share recipes, post updates and more, in the office and online.
  • Offer discounts, recognition, time off, or other rewards. Nothing encourages activity like a great return – so give plenty of public recognition to celebrate employees’ achievements and successes.
  • Share success stories. Workers are more likely to jump on the fitness bandwagon if they can see what others have achieved. Sharing personal accomplishments puts a positive emphasis on each employee’s strengths and potential.
  • Use your resources. If you’re not sure how to begin the wellness conversation on social media, recruit your top internal health advocates to get the ball rolling and to manage your team Chances are your employees are interested, and if encouraged, will take a stronger role in coordinating activities that benefit them, the company, and their associates.

The bottom line is that social media networking can provide strong support for your health and wellness program year round, without adding cost. Through creative incentives and careful management – including a clear use policy and well-defined privacy guidelines – the right networks can transform your current workplace into an active, dynamic social community.

If you’re not enjoying the benefits of a wellness program at your company, join CBIA Healthy Connections at your company’s next renewal. It’s free as part of your participation in CBIA Health Connections!

Set Goals for a Healthier New Year

It’s not a coincidence that the gyms are packed in January — nor that the crowds thin in February. When it comes to our health and wellness, there’s also no denying our history, past successes, or lack of progress. Striking an effective balance between measurable action and good intentions is a challenge we all face in our personal and professional lives. But it’s not as simple as just labeling people action oriented or procrastinators — we’re all busy chasing kids, dogs, paychecks and as many other pressing details as there are hours in the day.

But now it’s a new year, a clean slate, tabula rasa. Coming off a season where many of us indulge by overeating, running around and pushing our bodies to unhealthy places, it is the perfect time to make specific plans, set goals and execute strategies that will truly help improve our health. Those plans should include diet, exercise and restful sleep, but the components that can have the most long-term value are how we make it easy to pursue health, and how we measure and reward ourselves and others for progress.

Employers can take an active role in encouraging and supporting their workers’ health and wellness efforts. There’s no question that the benefits of good health extend to productivity, quality, service and teamwork on the job. Employees who are healthier typically get sick less often, are more focused and rested. By establishing goals and working with your employees in positive ways, employers are directly affecting their bottom line.

Here are some simple tips for supporting health and wellness activities at work.

  • Offer healthcare screenings in the workplace. Many local healthcare service providers, clinics and insurers will come into offices to measure items such as cholesterol, blood pressure and body mass index. You also can arrange for flu-vaccination clinics, or address smoking-cessation, nutrition and other health and wellness initiatives.
  • Integrate the workplace in health-related activities. If employees are interested, establish a wellness committee and allow them to plan activities of interest to your workers. That could be inviting fitness or nutritional consultants to come speak during lunch or after work, bringing in yoga instructors, aerobic dance, fitness consultants or massage professionals. It also can include planning walks during the day, competitive sports after work, participating in charity events, and bringing healthy snacks, food and recipes into the office for sharing.
  • Set workplace-related goals. There’s power in sharing and collaboration. By setting team goals for weight loss, dietary changes, walking/exercise, smoking cessation and other commonly shared activities, employees can have fun, support one another, and think about health during the day. Offering simple rewards and incentives and publicly celebrating participation and successes builds teamwork and improves morale, as well.
  • Encourage healthcare education. Most large health benefits providers have extensive websites detailing healthcare actions, and offering guidance and useful information.
  • Join the CBIA Healthy Connections wellness program. This valuable program is available to all CBIA Health Connections participants at no additional charge.

We’re all responsible for our own health and wellness. Employers can’t mandate health, but they certainly can support efforts and encourage their workers. By discussing and supporting personal efforts, getting involved, facilitating planning and rewarding for participation, each of us can make 2017 a healthier year.