Excuse me while I snooze

We’ve just changed the clocks. The days are getting darker earlier, and they’re busier than ever with school, autumn sports, and activities going at full blast. With the return to earlier mornings and a fuller schedule, chances are you and your family members are on the go constantly and you’re tired. When we’re behind in our sleep, it affects how we perform, behave, get along with others, and our overall health. And with the holidays right around the corner, the pace is going to quicken even more. So it’s important to think about how much sleep we’re getting now and how best to ensure good sleep hygiene practices.

Sleeping well is as critical to our overall health and productivity as diet and exercise, and is important for everyone, from childhood through adulthood. A good sleep hygiene routine promotes healthy sleep and daytime alertness, and can prevent the development of sleep problems and certain disorders.

What is good sleep hygiene?

Sleep disturbances and daytime sleepiness are the most telling signs of poor sleep hygiene. The most important sleep hygiene measure is to maintain a regular sleep and waking pattern seven days a week. It is also important to spend an appropriate amount of time in bed, not too little, or too much. This varies by individual; for example, if someone has a problem with daytime sleepiness, they should spend a minimum of eight hours in bed. If they have difficulty sleeping at night, they should limit themselves to seven hours in bed in order to keep the sleep pattern consolidated. Age and other issues also affect how much you should be sleeping.

Good sleep hygiene practices include a variety of elements you can influence. Here are 10 common hints for improving restfulness:

  • Avoid napping during the day; it can disturb the normal pattern of sleep and wakefulness.
  • Avoid stimulants such as caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol too close to bedtime. While alcohol is known to speed the onset of sleep, it disrupts sleep in the second half of your cycle as the body begins to metabolize the alcohol.
  • Exercise can promote good sleep. Vigorous exercise should be practiced in the morning or late afternoon. A relaxing exercise, like yoga, can be done before bed to help initiate a restful night’s sleep.
  • Food can be disruptive right before sleep; stay away from large meals close to bedtime. Also dietary changes can cause sleep problems — for example, it’s not a good time to snack on spicy or greasy dishes in the evening. And, remember, chocolate contains caffeine, though it has many healthy properties, as well.
  • Ensure adequate exposure to natural light. This is particularly important for older people who may not venture outside as frequently as children and adults. Light exposure helps maintain a healthy sleep-wake cycle.
  • Establish a regular, relaxing bedtime routine. Try to avoid emotionally upsetting conversations, activities and TV shows before trying to go to sleep. Don’t dwell on, or bring your problems to bed.
  • Associate your bed with sleep. It’s not a good idea to use your bed to watch TV, listen to the radio, for playtime or for work.
  • Make sure that your sleep environment is pleasant and relaxing. The bed should be comfortable, and your room should not be too hot or cold, or too bright.
  • The kids and dog have their own beds…they should use them!
  • Be careful about sleep aids — they can be habit-forming, interfere with the restful (REM) sleep your body needs to rejuvenate itself, and can interact poorly with other medications.

What you should know about Melatonin

Melatonin’s main job in the body is to regulate night and day cycles or sleep-wake cycles. Darkness causes the body to produce more Melatonin, which signals the body to prepare for sleep. Light decreases Melatonin production and signals the body to prepare for being awake. Some people who have trouble sleeping have low levels of Melatonin. It is thought that adding Melatonin from supplements might help them sleep.

Melatonin is likely safe for most adults when taken by mouth short-term or applied to the skin. But like any medicine or supplement, you should check with your physician before taking it. Melatonin can cause some side effects including headache, short-term feelings of depression, daytime sleepiness, dizziness, stomach cramps and irritability.

If you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, don’t use Melatonin. It also might interfere with ovulation, making it more difficult to become pregnant. Melatonin should not be used in most children — because of its effects on other hormones, it may interfere with development during adolescence. Additionally, Melatonin can raise blood pressure in people who are taking certain medications to control blood pressure. Melatonin also might increase blood sugar in people with diabetes, and can make symptoms of depression worse.

While found naturally in the body, Melatonin used as medicine is usually made synthetically in a laboratory. It is most commonly available in pill form, but also available in forms that can be placed in the cheek or under the tongue. This allows the Melatonin to be absorbed directly into the body.

People use Melatonin to adjust the body’s internal clock. It is used for jet lag, for adjusting sleep-wake cycles in people whose daily work schedule changes (shift-workers), and for helping blind people establish a day and night cycle. It is also used for the inability to fall asleep (insomnia); delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS); insomnia associated with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); insomnia due to certain high-blood pressure medications called beta-blockers; and sleep problems in children with developmental disorders including autism, cerebral palsy, and intellectual disabilities. It is also used as a sleep aid after discontinuing the use of benzodiazepine drugs and to reduce the side effects of stopping smoking.

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Be sure to check out the CBIA Healthy Connections wellness program at your company’s next renewal. It’s free as part of your participation in CBIA Health Connections!