Falling Into a Healthy Rhythm

While it’s only October and the autumn leaves haven’t even peaked, the pull of the end-of-year chaos is already sucking us in like a dark hole absorbing matter. Halloween is right around the corner, and Thanksgiving isn’t far behind. We know what’s coming, and it can’t be stopped or even slowed. Youthful exuberance and idealism aside, we’ll soon be smack in the middle of the craziest time of the year, and for many, the toughest, emotionally and physically.

The next few months can be especially difficult to face if you’re not happy with yourself, your job, your relationships, finances, your family and many other factors. End-of-year blues are common even for those who appear emotionally happy and balanced – it’s when many people take stock, realize how quickly time is passing, and check into their personal “dashboard” of achievements, goals and tasks.

If we made resolutions back in January, we can’t avoid measuring what we have – or have not – accomplished. And for many people, the upcoming holidays serve as a reminder of lost or distant friends and family. If you’re alone, the holidays can be even more isolating as people celebrate around us and we feel invisible and detached.

Maybe we thought we’d already have been promoted by now, a significant relationship would have appeared or matured, some pounds lost, some light found. We may have disappointed someone or ourselves by things we did or did not do, find or accomplish.

These difficulties are exacerbated by the loss of light and return of cold weather. Colder days and reduced sunlight can trigger Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), a psychological state that literally changes our biology and can cause or add to depression.

Even if we don’t suffer from chemical or emotional depression, the final months of the year are challenging. Psychologists point out that there is a difference between the holiday blues, which are often temporary and go away once the season ends, and more serious conditions such as depression, SAD, and anxiety disorders. According to the American Psychological Association (APA), depression occurs when feelings of extreme sadness or despair last for at least two weeks or longer and when they interfere with activities of daily living such as working or even eating and sleeping. Depressed individuals tend to feel helpless, and hopeless about changing their situation.

If your sense of sadness or “the blues” seem to linger or become more intense, you may want to seek help from a mental health professional, such as a psychologist, who can help determine if you have depression and how best to treat it. The APA also cautions about the risks of turning to alcohol for comfort. Although it may seem to bring temporary relief, it is actually a central nervous system depressant and a diuretic. Alcohol use affects balance, increases the risk for falls, may not interact well with medications, and disrupts sleep, which has a number of health consequences.

Take Charge, and Keep Moving

There are a number of steps we can take to reduce stress and depression, and to lift our spirits. To start, it’s always beneficial to try and continue our normal routines to help feel like we’re still in control. We can consciously try to not over-eat and make time for exercise and rest.

Additionally, personal outreach, especially socializing and connecting with old friends and associates is important for our emotional health any time of year. Today’s electronic world often allows us instantaneous messaging and the ability to “reach out and touch” someone far away, but virtual communication through email and tools like Facebook and Twitter can’t replace the value of face-to-face interactions. We are social creatures, and while digital outreach is valuable and sometimes our easiest option, the Internet tends to act as a buffer between us and real intimacy.

Relationships and effective communication are built on eye contact, touch, feedback and unspoken physical communication. When possible, make the effort to visit friends and neighbors, attend parties and gatherings, contribute personal time through charitable efforts and catch up with people in person.

Here are some helpful hints for maintaining your balance as we get into the deepest recesses of the year:

  • Practice forgiveness, of yourself and for others. There’s still time and opportunity to adjust your goals, set new ones, or analyze what you might do differently going forward. Negativity wears on you and those you touch – so does a positive attitude!
  • Maintain your routine. Keep going to the gym, taking your walks, doing your special projects. The end of the year is nothing but a date on the calendar . . . life continues and, in fact, can get better as you set and work toward new, achievable goals.
  • Exercise regularly. Whether you walk, go to the gym, ride a bike, take yoga or spinning classes or just hit the treadmill in your basement, take time every day to exercise. It’s good for your heart, your respiratory system, your bones and joints and your mental health.
  • Eat a healthy diet. Low fat, low sugar, low salt should be our mantra. Eat plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables, savor low-fat milk and yogurt, avoid fried foods and go easy on red meat and useless carbs from bread, cookies and cake, pasta, processed foods and snacks.
  • Don’t smoke. Tobacco products are bad for you and for others, period. They have a serious impact on your short- and long-term health, and cost a lot of money. There are many smoking-cessation programs available, and your physician can prescribe medications or aids to help with nicotine withdrawal.
  • Don’t consume too much alcohol. Drinking shortens your life, and can lead to strokes, heart disease and other illnesses. Alcohol also is a depressant and a diuretic, and inhibits restful sleep.
  • Get plenty of sleep. Adults should try to sleep eight hours, when possible, children even more. Pushing ourselves reduces our immunity to disease, makes us irritable, and makes accidents and mistakes more likely.
  • Talk to people . . . and to your physician. If you’re feeling down, worried, anxious or depressed, share your concerns with a friend or a medical professional. If depression is affecting your sleep, diet, work, school or behavior, ask your physician about medical or counseling interventions. Seeing a therapist (clinical psychologist, psychiatrist or professional counselor) for guidance and validation is healthy, smart and practical.

Taking care of ourselves is the gift that keeps on giving, any time of year. Make room for the people and activities that are most meaningful, and as the holidays rapidly approach, remember to breathe, set daily and weekly goals, and not be so hard on yourself or on others.


Be sure to check out the CBIA Healthy Connections wellness program at your company’s next renewal. It’s free as part of your participation in CBIA Health Connections!