Get Active, Outdoors!

It’s time to pack away the guilt about how much we ate and how little we’ve exercised since November and get ourselves motivated to stay active this winter. Exercise and play are important for our physical and our mental health. Even though it’s colder and it still gets dark early, getting outdoors after work or school and on the weekends should be part of our wellness strategy. The fresh air is good for our lungs, the sun is good for our bodies (when we protect ourselves), and there are many interesting and healthy pursuits waiting outside our doors.

This season is rich in recreational opportunities that expand on the exercise and fitness we can be pursuing at the gym, in our homes, or at classes. Walking is the easiest example, whether in our neighborhood, at a local school or park. Jogging or hiking offers scenic beauty and interesting wintery landscapes as backdrop for our workout. Additionally, we live in a region that offers parks and forests for cross-country skiing, snow shoeing and snowmobiling, close-by mountains for downhill skiing, and frozen ponds or rinks for ice skating and hockey. And when the snow is abundant, so are opportunities for sledding, tubing and tobogganing, activities that are fun for the entire family and a good workout.

No matter the choice of outdoor recreational activity, it’s critical that we take appropriate measures to protect ourselves. That includes dressing for the weather, making sure we’re properly hydrated, wearing sunscreen, knowing our limitations, and always respecting Mother Nature.

Dressing in layers and wearing the right types of materials are critical for keeping warm in the cold weather. But when planning our outdoor wardrobe, moisture management is also an important consideration. To keep the body warm during high-energy activities, clothing should transport moisture away from the skin to the outer surface of the fabric where it can evaporate. Also, look for garments made from the new stretch fabrics for better fit and performance.

Cotton is a poor choice for insulation, because it absorbs moisture and loses any insulating value when it gets wet. Instead, moisture-wicking synthetics which move moisture away from the skin are the best choice for active winter sports like skiing, snowboarding, hiking or climbing. Not only do synthetic fabrics wick moisture away from the skin, they dry quickly and help keep us warm in the process.

The next layer should be a lightweight stretchy insulator, such as a breathable fleece sweater or vest. The final part of our cold-weather wear should be a lightweight and versatile shell jacket. Fabrics like three-layer Gore-Tex and Windstopper allow companies to create shells that are ultra lightweight while remaining waterproof, windproof, and breathable. For aerobic activities, a shell’s ventilating features are particularly important. Look for underarm zippers, venting pockets and back flaps.

Always bring a hat and gloves, regardless of the weather or activity. Proper foot protection is critical, as well — wear insulated and water-proof shoes or boots, and synthetic socks that won’t absorb sweat. As with the rest of our clothing, synthetic materials work best for protecting us against the extremes. Look for fleece hats made with Windstopper fabric, gloves and mittens layered with Gore-Tex and fleece, and socks made of synthetic, moisture-wicking materials.

No matter where we’re going or what we’re doing outdoors, bring plenty of water or sports drinks, and try to avoid caffeine or alcohol — both actually dry you out, instead of hydrating, and alcohol lowers our body temperature. Also, make sure to have a cell phone, that somebody knows where you are, and when you’ll be returning. And remember to apply a protective lip balm and to wear sunscreen — the sun’s ultraviolet rays remain potent, even in the winter, and hydrating our skin with a UV-protective moisturizer will help protect from wind and other elements.

Finally, though it may not be at the top of our “fun” list, when it snows most of us have to shovel. Dressing warmly and appropriately is key, and the same tips for hiking and sports apply:  Stretch before lifting, stay hydrated, and knows our limitations. Avoid alcohol, caffeine or nicotine before shoveling as these drugs place more strain on our body and on our heart. Use a shovel that isn’t too big to reduce weight, lift with our knees, not the back, and start slow and work steadily – take plenty of breaks, don’t rush and don’t try and lift too much at one time.

When it comes to winter activities in the outdoors, the best advice, overall, is to be smart and know our limitations. Many winter sports injuries happen at the end of the day, when people overexert themselves to finish that one last run or hike one more mile before the day’s end. A majority of these injuries can easily be prevented if participants prepare by keeping in good physical condition, stretch before getting started, stay alert and stop when tired or in pain. But the rewards are worth the risks – get out there, have fun, and stay healthy!


Be sure to check out the CBIA Healthy Connections wellness program at your company’s next renewal. It’s free as part of your participation in CBIA Health Connections!