Getting comfortable at work

How you feel about your work place, and your work space, has as much to do with productivity, teamwork and improved communication as it does comfort. Employees spend a lot of time at work, and the composition of their working, meeting, and common areas says much about an organization’s culture, values and health.

People like a flexible work culture that helps each employee personalize his or her experience as much as possible. Business owners are finding that more flexibility leads to greater retention, better production and improved customer and employee satisfaction. All of this leads to a better bottom line, as well.

Not everyone works the same way. While some people may prefer a constant buzz around the office, others like quiet spaces to concentrate. It’s a bonus when an employer can match someone’s needs to how – and what — they produce, or to the way they like to work. Varied spaces, when it’s possible, enhance workplace wellness and make offices more inviting.

Customized work spaces can have lounge chairs and couches as well as traditional desks. Mixing it up in the workplace gives employees something different to look at every day instead of a boring, neutral-colored walled cubicle. Empty or unused spaces can be retrofitted as open conference areas, meeting rooms, or gathering places for brainstorming, quality checks, or coffee, juice and snack stations. Plants can be added for warmth and color. The idea is to think creatively, and the more you can involve employees in planning how to use office and warehouse space, the more engaged they will be.

Workers whose companies allow them to help decide when, where, and how they work are more likely to be satisfied with their jobs, perform better, and view their company as more innovative than competitors that don’t offer such choices. We can’t always have what we want, but trying to find a compromise – and remaining open to employee ideas and suggestions – goes a long way.

Other simple steps can be taken to improve life in the office, on the plant floor or in other working areas. These include:

  • Place desks near natural light, which helps keep us better attuned to our own circadian rhythms and is a mood enhancer
  • Choose bright and welcoming artwork and colors
  • Allow employees to decorate their own cubicles, offices or work spaces, and to contribute to decorating the office, meeting rooms and common areas
  • Create open spaces throughout the work area by lowering the sides of cubicles and creating café-style seating for mingling and working
  • Reduce clutter so people don’t feel hemmed in, and to reduce visual chaos
  • Involve employees by asking them how they work best, what currently helps or doesn’t, and by offering them a decision-making role in rearranging work areas
  • The typical American sits an average of 9.3 hours a day – which is far longer than most of us sleep each day. Consider “walking or standing meetings,” especially for smaller groups, and when possible, take the meeting outdoors.

The more we can give employees a say in creating a comfortable, effective workplace for themselves and their peers, the happier they’ll be.  Less stress means greater satisfaction and increased productivity and retention. Little that we do in life is “one size fits all.” So the workplace shouldn’t try to be that, either.

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If you’re not enjoying the benefits of a wellness program at your company, join CBIA Healthy Connections at your company’s next renewal. It’s free as part of your participation in CBIA Health Connections!