Keep moving — even when you’re not!

Unless you work in an environment that is physically challenging or potentially dangerous, the worst most of us have to fear at work is eye or ear strain, sore backs or necks, repetitive motion injuries or circulation problems. The latter issue can result from sitting too long at your desk or workstation, in a plane, bus or another vehicle. Repeated inactivity or lack of entire-body movement for extended periods inhibits circulation and can lead to clotting problems.

Two of the more common circulation-related health issues include the risk of developing Deep Vein Thrombosis or a Pulmonary Embolism.

Veins are blood vessels that return blood from the tissues of the body back to the heart. The body has two distinct systems of veins — superficial and deep. The superficial system is made up of veins that are close to the skin. These are the blood vessels we frequently can see on our hands, arms or legs that can become more prominent when we exercise. The deep system comprises veins within the muscles of the body. The two systems are connected by small communicating veins. The body regulates the amount of blood going through both systems as a way of rigidly controlling the body’s central temperature.

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a condition where a blood clot forms in a vein of the deep system. DVTs can occur anywhere in the body, but are most frequently found in the deep veins of the legs, thighs, and pelvis. They may infrequently arise from the upper extremities usually because of trauma.

Thrombophlebitis is a condition in which there is both inflammation and a blood clot in a vein. Thrombophlebitis can occur in either superficial or deep veins. Superficial thrombophlebitis occurs in veins close to the skin surface, and usually causes pain, swelling and redness in the area of the vein. Superficial thrombophlebitis usually is treated with heat, elevation of the affected leg or arm, and anti-inflammatory medications.

A thrombosis in a deep vein is a much more serious problem than one in a superficial vein, because a piece of the clot can break off and travel through the deep veins back to the heart, and eventually be pumped by the heart into the arteries of the lung. When this happens, the condition is called pulmonary embolism (PE). Pulmonary embolisms occur in 30 percent of people with DVT, and cause 60,000 deaths annually, many of them unrecognized and labeled incorrectly as heart attacks. Blood clots from DVT can lodge in the legs, heart, kidneys, lungs or brain.

Symptoms of deep vein thrombosis may be difficult to identify. That’s because DVT symptoms are similar to many other health problems. People most at risk from DVT are over 60, smoke, or are overweight. Women on birth control or patches, or people who sit for long periods of time can be at risk as well.

If you or someone you know has any of the DVT symptoms below — especially if they occur suddenly — call your doctor right away:

  • Swelling in one or both legs
  • Pain or tenderness in one or both legs, which may occur only while standing or walking
  • Warmth in theskin of the affected leg
  • Red or discolored skin in the affected leg
  • Visible surface veins
  • Leg fatigue

If a blood clot breaks free and travels to your lungs, it’s called a pulmonary embolism, and it can be fatal. Pulmonary embolism may not cause symptoms, but if you ever suffer sudden coughing, which may bring up blood; sharp chest pain; rapid breathing or shortness of breath; or severe lightheadedness, call 911 or go to an emergency room immediately.

How to improve your circulation and avoid potential clots

About 350,000 Americans are diagnosed with DVT and pulmonary embolism each year, although it is estimated that some 300,000 more adults have undiagnosed DVT/PT. The condition has a 6 percent to 12 percent mortality rate.

If you’re at risk, there is much you can do to prevent DVT. Here are 10 tips to help avoid circulation-related clotting or related problems:

  • Eat a healthy diet, maintain an active lifestyle andexercise regularly — daily, if possible. Walking, swimming, and bicycling are all great activities.
  • If you smoke, quit! Nicotine therapy (in patches, gums, or sprays) and support groups can make this easier to do.
  • Getyour blood pressure checked regularly; take steps to lower it, if necessary, and report any family or personal history of blood-clotting problems to your doctor.
  • Discuss alternatives tobirth control pills or hormone-replacement therapy with your doctor.
  • If you are on an airplane for more than four hours, walk when possible and while awaiting connecting flights, or do leg stretches in your seat.
  • Stay well-hydrated and avoid alcohol and caffeine consumption – both contribute to dehydration, which cause blood to thicken and the veins to narrow.
  • In the workplace, stretch, move around regularly, and walk as often as possible, even if to the lunch room, bathrooms or outside during breaks.
  • Avoid wearing short, tight socks or crossing your legs for long periods.
  • When traveling by car, stop once every hour or two to walk around and stretch.
  • Consider purchasing compression stockings at a medical supply store and wearing them during your travels to help reduce swelling.

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Be sure to check out the CBIA Healthy Connections wellness program at your company’s next renewal. It’s free as part of your participation in CBIA Health Connections!