Keep Your Skin in the Game

The cold weather often means an increase in chapped lips, dry, itchy skin, rashes and a worsening of skin conditions like eczema or psoriasis. The main culprit is lack of moisture. During winter, the humidity in the outside air plunges, and thanks to indoor heating, we’re assailed by dry, warm air in our house, office, school or workplace.

During flu and cold season, we’re also washing our hands more often than ever, which saps the natural oils in our skin, leaving them dehydrated until they crack, peel and bleed.

The skin barrier is a mix of proteins, lipids and oils. It protects your skin, and how good a job it does is largely genetic, but also a measure of environmental conditions. If you have a weak barrier, you’re more prone to symptoms of sensitive skin such as itching, inflammation and eczema. Your hands are also more likely to become very dry in winter if they’re constantly exposed to cold air, water, extreme heat or other environmental factors.

One solution is to keep ourselves, and our skin, properly hydrated. But drinking water alone won’t do the trick for your skin; it also requires replenishment. Using moisturizers especially formatted for your skin is an important tool in your hydration arsenal. But putting moisturizers on once a day isn’t enough – you need to apply five or more applications daily to afford day-long protection. Coverage should include hands, fingernails, face, arms and legs and even your feet.

There are many effective hand creams and body lotions available in our local drugstores and supermarkets.  Choosing the one that’s best may require some trial and error, but focus on the two main ingredients that make the greatest difference:  emollients and humectants.

Emollients act as lubricants on the surface of the skin. They fill the crevices between cells that are ready to be shed and help the loose edges of the dead skin cells that are left behind stick together. Emollients help keep the skin soft, smooth, and pliable. Look for ingredients such as lanolin, jojoba oil, isopropyl palmitate, propylene glycol linoleate, squalene, and glycerol stearate.

Humectants draw moisture from the environment to the skin’s surface, increasing the water content of the skin’s outer layer. Scan the ingredients label for common humectants such as glycerin, hyaluronic acid, sorbitol, propylene glycerol, urea, and lactic acid.

If your hands go from just being dry and rough to having little cracks, or fissures, and are tender or bleeding, it’s time to move on to more therapeutic moisturizers. Petroleum jelly is a reliable standby. Or choose a thick, rich moisturizer in a formula that contains heavier ingredients such as dimethicone, cocoa or shea butter, or beeswax. Applying a generous coating at bedtime, and wearing a pair of cotton gloves will help retain the healing salve until it can be fully absorbed while you sleep.

If you already have sensitive skin, look for a moisturizer that contains soothing ingredients such as chamomile or aloe, and doesn’t contain potential allergens such as fragrances or dyes. Also, avoid products containing acids, which can irritate sensitive skin.

As we age, our skin tends to become drier because our oil-producing glands become less active. To keep skin soft and well hydrated, choose an oil-based moisturizer that contains petrolatum as the base, along with antioxidants or alpha hydroxy acids to combat wrinkles. These ingredients help hold in moisture and prevent flaky, scaly skin.

Hand washing, though critical for your overall health and to prevent the spread of germs, also dries out skin and hands. The best bet is to choose a mild soap, use warm — not hot — water, pat your hands dry and apply a moisturizer right away. If you have severely dry hands or you wash your hands a dozen or more times a day, substitute a hand-sanitizing gel or wipes for some soap-and-water sessions.

Other tricks for limiting dry skin is to sleep with a humidifier at night, take short, warm (not hot) showers, and to wear gloves, a hat and sunscreen when you’re outdoors. A balanced diet rich in vegetables and fruits also provides the vitamins and minerals your body needs to help it remain healthy. If redness, peeling and tenderness persist, see a dermatologist. He or she can prescribe a steroid cream to help fight inflammation, and also check on whether your dry hands may be due to a skin condition such as eczema or psoriasis.

# # #

Be sure to check out the CBIA Healthy Connections wellness program at your company’s next renewal. It’s free as part of your participation in CBIA Health Connections!