Take Care of Your Skin

As soon as the thermostat falls and the heat goes on, many of us suffer from dry itchy skin, especially on our faces, hands and feet. The dry, cold air exacerbates skin conditions like eczema, saps moisture and critical natural oils, and can leave our skin feeling parched, raw, flaky and irritated. Cold-weather elements affect us regardless of the type of heating we use at home or at work, but there are several steps we can take to mitigate the damage and to help keep our skin healthier.

Using moisturizers is a sure bet, but with so many choices and marketing pitches, it’s hard to know what’s best for your own skin. The moisturizer you use in the warmer months may not be as effective in the winter, so as the weather changes, you should adapt your skin regimen, as well. Find an ointment that’s oil-based, rather than water-based, since the oil creates a protective barrier on the skin that retains more moisture than a cream or lotion.

Seeing a specialist is recommended, as well. A dermatologist can analyze your skin type, diagnose maladies, screen for skin cancer and other illnesses and provide professional advice on steps you can be taking and the types of products best suited for your body chemistry and situation. Remaining properly hydrated throughout the winter months is critical for your skin and overall health, and wearing sunscreen when outdoors is essential.

Here are several additional tips for helping maintain healthy skin in the colder, drier months:

  • Apply moisturizers. Content, not cost, should drive this decision. Higher-priced products are charging you for packaging and marketing as well as content. How your skin responds should be the deciding factor. Switch to oil-based products in the colder months, but be aware that not oil-based moisturizers are appropriate for your face. Choose “non-clogging” oils like avocado, mineral, primrose or almond oil. Shea oil or butter can clog facial pores. Also look for lotions containing “humectants,” a class of substances (including glycerin, sorbitol, and alpha-hydroxyl acids) that attract moisture to your skin.

Also, if your facial skin is uncomfortably dry, avoid using harsh peels, masks, and alcohol-based toners or astringents, all of which can strip vital oil from our skin. Instead, find a cleansing milk or mild foaming cleanser, a toner with no alcohol, and masks that are “deeply hydrating,” rather than clay-based, which tends to draw moisture out of the face, and apply them less often.

  • Use sunscreen. Even in the winter months, the sun’s ultra violet rays can penetrate and damage our skin. Use a broad-spectrum sunscreen on exposed face and hands about half an hour before going outdoors and remember to reapply it if you’re outside for a long period playing, walking or working.
  • Wear gloves. It’s hard to keep our hands warm in the cold, dry weather because the skin on our hands is thinner and has fewer oil glands.  To avoid itching and cracking, wear gloves when outdoors. Cotton and wool are preferable to synthetics; if you have sensitive skin, wear a thin cotton glove under your regular gloves for added protection.
  • Avoid wet gloves and socks. There’s nothing as uncomfortable as having wet hands and feet. That moisture trapped against your skin also causes dryness and irritation. Wear cotton near your skin whenever possible, or invest in “wicking” materials which help keep your skin dry. Also use latex or rubber gloves if your hands are in the water often, such as when washing dishes, doing laundry or at work.
  • Invest in a dehumidifier. Whether you’re heating your home with oil, electricity, gas or wood, dry air is bad for our skin. Humidifiers add moisture to the air, which helps our skin and our lungs. Place units in different locations in the house, and in your bedroom.
  • Remember your feet. Don’t forget that our feet dry out in the cooler months, along with our faces and hands. Use lotions that contain petroleum jelly or glycerin instead of water-based lotions. And use exfoliates to get the dead skin off periodically; that helps any moisturizers you use to sink in faster and deeper.
  • Avoid really hot baths or showers. As great as hot water feels on our tired bones, the intense heat of a hot shower or bath actually breaks down the lipid barriers in the skin, which can lead to a loss of moisture. A lukewarm bath with oatmeal orbaking soda can help relieve skin that is so dry it has become itchy.

If you practice these common-sense skin-care steps, your body will thank you. Remember to check in with a dermatologist or skin-care specialist to ensure you’re doing the right things for your specific needs, and enjoy all the winter has to offer!


 

Be sure to check out the CBIA Healthy Connections wellness program at your company’s next renewal. It’s free as part of your participation in CBIA Health Connections!