Take the Lead on Workplace Wellness

It’s that time of year again – the apex of when distracted and cheerful meet pressured and busy. People are running around and more stressed than usual, especially as the days until the holidays count down. It’s also a challenging time in many workplaces, as year-end deadlines, workloads and customer expectations peak.

The good news is that the season will be done before we know it. But keeping employees healthy and well is a year-round venture. Thinking creatively and strategically, you can use the season to remind staff about healthy practices and to reinforce behaviors for the holidays, and for the new year.

Sharing educational materials about healthy eating is a good start. Eating a balanced diet that is low in saturated fats and salt and rich in fruits, vegetables, fiber, and whole grains — as well as healthy sources of proteins, vitamins and calcium — are critical ingredients for a healthier future. Eating smart helps us maintain a healthy weight and reduces our risk of chronic illnesses, including heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and certain cancers.

Remind employees that the best way to avoid overeating is to maintain a routine eating schedule during the holidays, pile our plates with vegetables and fruits, eat mindfully, take the time to enjoy our food, and consume a healthy breakfast every day. Additionally, employees can be encouraged to share meals at work, and explore smart nutrition and dietary practices informally, or through sessions at or after work with nutritionists and dietitians.

Variety is also important — sampling a small amount of everything that has different textures and colors on the table can help alleviate cravings. And eating in moderation is always key.  For more information, a good guide is the USDA nutrition website called “My Plate.” It can be found at www.choosemyplate.gov.

Plan exercise and good health practices

Physical activity is one of the most important steps we can take towards a healthier future. If employees are not currently exercising, encourage them to start slowly and build up – employers can think about introducing incentives and friendly competitions, and offering time and space for these team-building activities. Fitness experts are happy to come into workplaces to meet employees and to help them design team or personalized fitness routines.

Set simple goals such as at least 30 minutes three to five days a week of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise, or an hour per week of high-intensity aerobic exercise. The trick is to stay active – staff can take the stairs instead of elevators, and engage in a power walk instead of a power lunch. By setting goals and measuring achievement weekly, it makes exercising more fun and helps improve morale and teamwork. And by offering rewards to all who participate, you both condone and thank employees for their efforts to remain healthier and more productive.

Here are few other tips for improving health and wellness at the holidays, and throughout the year:

  • Stop smoking. Use the end of the year as an opportunity to remind employees of the value in reducing or eliminating smoking and the use of smokeless tobacco products at work and away from work. Point them to programs that are available online, in groups, and through local organizations. Many employers choose to bring smoking-cessation programs into the workplace, as well.
  • Drink alcoholic beverages in moderation. Alcohol adds calories, interferes with restful sleep and leaves you dehydrated. And while one glass a day of red wine might help prevent heart disease, alcohol abuse accounts for 79,000 preventable deaths every year, and is associated with an increased risk of liver disease and some forms of cancer, as well as tens of thousands of motor vehicle accidents annually.
  • Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water throughout the day, and avoid snacks and foods high in salt, fats and sugar.
  • Get plenty of rest. Between traveling, shopping, and attending holiday events, it can be difficult to get enough sleep during the holiday season. But getting a good night’s rest will leave people refreshed and can also help to reduce stress. Most adults require seven to eight hours of sleep per night. Even if traveling or away from home during the holidays, try to maintain a regular bedtime routine. Also, avoid caffeine, alcohol, heavy meals and exercising right before bedtime.
  • Set realistic team and personal goals. This is a great time to plan healthy activities for the upcoming year. Consider creating a health and wellness planning team or committee, link activities to monthly health-awareness topics, and work with your Wellness Champion to incorporate ideas available through CBIA, insurance providers, and other health and wellness resources.

Employers play an important role in their employees’ health and wellness. By taking the lead, communicating your interest, and encouraging participation, 2017 will be a healthier year for everyone!


If you’re not enjoying the benefits of a wellness program at your company, join CBIA Healthy Connections at your company’s next renewal. It’s free as part of your participation in CBIA Health Connections!