Welcome to Lyme Disease central

It’s nice to brag about Connecticut’s shoreline, rolling hills, beautiful rivers and scenic vistas. We’re among the leaders in quality of life, have a highly skilled workforce, and a history rich in innovation, invention and discovery. Unfortunately, we’re also the national poster child for Lyme Disease, which — literally and figuratively — has made the nutmeg state its bull’s eye.

Lyme Disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected blacklegged ticks. Typical symptoms include fever, headache, fatigue, joint pain and in many, but not all cases, that characteristic “bull’s-eye-like” skin rash called erythema migrans. It’s estimated to affect 300,000 Americans a year and 65,000 in Europe, typically in the spring and early summer.

If left untreated, infection can spread to joints, the heart, and the nervous system. Lyme disease is diagnosed based on symptoms, physical findings and the possibility of exposure to infected ticks.  Laboratory testing is helpful but not always conclusive, and Lyme Disease often is misdiagnosed. It is the most commonly reported vector-borne illness (meaning transmitted via organisms such as ticks or mosquitoes) in the United States, even though it does not occur nationwide and is heavily concentrated in the northeast and upper Midwest.

Most cases of Lyme disease can be treated successfully with a few weeks of antibiotics. It is not contagious and cannot be spread from person to person. But there are certain precautions we can take to prevent the spread of the illness, including using insect repellent, removing ticks promptly, applying pesticides, and reducing tick habitat, especially since the ticks that transmit Lyme Disease can occasionally transmit other tick-borne diseases as well.

While it is a good idea to take preventive measures against ticks year-round, we should be extra vigilant in warmer months (April through September) when ticks are most active. And in summer, when we’re out hiking, biking, camping, and spending a lot more time in and around grass and woods, there are several steps we can take to limit bites from ticks, mosquitoes and other disease-bearing insects.

Avoid direct contact with ticks and mosquitoes when possible. If you can, avoid wooded and bushy areas with high grass and leaf litter. When hiking, picnicking or walking, try to remain in the center of trails.

Wear long pants and protective clothing, and when you’re done recreating or working outdoors, check your clothing for ticks, since they can migrate once in the car or home.

Use appropriate repellants. We can repel ticks and mosquitoes with DEET or Permethrin. Here are some useful hints for maximizing our use of tick repellant:

  • Use repellents that contain 20 percent or more DEET (N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide) on the exposed skin for protection that lasts up to several hours. Always follow product instructions. Parents should apply this product to their children, avoiding hands, eyes, and mouth.
  • Use products that contain permethrin on clothing. Treat clothing and gear, such as boots, pants, socks and tents. It remains protective through several washings. Pre-treated clothing is available and remains protective for up to 70 washings.
  • If you’re using other repellents, go to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) website for safety information.

Find and remove ticks from our bodies. Finding and removing ticks embedded in our skin can be gross, but painless. The best bet is to keep them at bay. But if they do find us, here are tips for dealing with them easily and effectively:

  • Bathe or shower as soon as possible after coming indoors (preferably within two hours) to wash off and more easily find ticks that are crawling on us.
  • Conduct a full-body tick check using a hand-held or full-length mirror to view all parts of the body upon return from tick-infested areas. Parents should check their children for ticks under the arms, in and around the ears, inside the belly button, behind the knees, between the legs, around the waist, and especially in their hair.
  • Examine gear and pets. Ticks can ride into the home on clothing and pets, then attach to a person later, so carefully examine pets, coats, and day packs. Tumble clothes in a dryer on high heat for an hour to kill remaining ticks.
  • Consult a doctor or a nurse (or check on the Internet) to determine the best method for removing the tick; it’s important to remove the entire tick, or it can leave parts embedded in our skin.

Should you or a family member develop a bull’s-eye-type red rash near the bite site, or exhibit other side effects such as a fever, lethargy or extreme exhaustion, consult a doctor and ask to be tested for Lyme Disease.

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Be sure to check out the CBIA Healthy Connections wellness program at your company’s next renewal. It’s free as part of your participation in CBIA Health Connections!